Short Story Analysis

Posted on November 4, 2009

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INTRODUCTION TO ENGLISH LITERATURE

ANALYSIS SHORT STORY OF

‘THE ADVENTURES OF ALADDIN’

BY THE BROTHERS GRIMM

Submitted by:

A. Qodir                                 C0308014

Agil Mahardika                    C0308017

Dita Surya Kartika              C0308031

Ezrava Kusuma A.             C0308034

Jusmar V.                             C0308042

Seto Hidayat                        C0308067

FACULTY OF LETTERS AND FINE ARTS

SEBELAS MARET UNIVERSITY

SURAKARTA

2009

THE ADVENTURES OF ALADDIN

Authors :           The Brothers Grimm are two brothers from Germany. Their names were Jacob Ludwig Karl Grimm (1785-1863) and Wilhelm Karl Grimm (1786-1859). Jacob was primarily a scientific philologist, having become interested at the university in medieval literature and the scientific investigation of language. Wilhelm was more a textual and literary critic. After several years in diplomatic and library posts in Kassel, the brothers went in 1830 to the University of Göttingen, where Wilhelm became a librarian and Jacob a lecturer on ancient law, literary history, and philosophy. The Grimm brothers were attracted to old German folktales, which they collected from many sources and published as Household Tales (2 volumes, 1812-1815; trans. 1884). The collection, expanded in 1857, is known as Grimm’s Fairy Tales. The brothers collaborated on numerous other works. This short story, The Adventures of Aladdin, is one of their works which was the adaptation of the famous fairy tales “Aladdin” from Iraq. This story is the different version of Aladdin’s Adventure.

 

Theme :           The theme of this story is about cleverness of someone to get many advantages in many kinds of situations. When Aladdin knew that the wizard wanted the old lamp so much he started to think that the old lamp should be worth. He took the lamp first. When Aladdin remembered about the genie of the ring he made use of it. He gave sleepy powder to Halima and made the wizard sleep so that he and Halima could back home.

 

Setting :

Setting of place: This story took the background in the village at Iraq. Actually that was not stated in the story but we can know where the place from how the authors describe the place was. We can acknowledge the name Sultan which was a familiar name in Iraq and most of people have known that Aladdin was the story that took place in Iraq. It was the fact, but some place in this story was an imaginary place (we can’t imagine the place exactly).

Setting of Time: One day, long time ago. We cannot know the time exactly. But, looking at the setting of place we can guest that this story probably happens at kingdom era.

Tone :           The general tone of the story is happy, although the hero tried to struggle from poverty. Also, the tone brings us to feel that the story is from distant land, faraway and imaginary place.

 

Atmosphere :           In common the authors create the simple atmosphere in this story, but there is still seen that the authors include the heroism, fantasy and epic. The authors include a little gloomy element but frequently it happens in happy condition.

 

Point of View :           “THE ADVENTURES OF ALADDIN” is narrated in the third-person point of view, with Aladdin as the major character. The type of this point of view is omniscient. The authors know exactly what the characters are thinking about. The author tells us anything (feel, vision, behavior) about his characters.

 

Style :           This story uses descriptive writing. The writers use adjective order to describe the character as seen on phrases;

“This smartly dressed dark-eyed man with a trim black beard and a splendid sapphire in his turban…”

“…a tall handsome young man…”

“…the beautiful black-eyed Sultan’s daughter.”

The writers also use varied adjective to characterize as seen on this phrase;

Slim and agile as he was…”

Adjectives and action words that the writers use are also describe the situation of some parts;

“It seemed to sparkle, though dimly lit by the flickering light of an old oil lamp…”

“Thousands of precious objects lay scattered about.”

“… thrusting out his arm to grab it, but Aladdin cautiously drew back.”

“Suddenly the room was flooded with a rosy light and a great genie with clasped hands appeared on a cloud.”

The writers are also use action words to substitute direct statements with more descriptive sentences;

“And the genie bowed respectfully…”

“The genie grinned with pleasure, nodded his head, and the wizard vanished.”

From two sentences above, it is easy to tell that the genie agreed to do so. However, the writers are not telling so but showing us how the genie made gestures that implicitly tell us the genie agreed to do so. The style and word choice the writers use make the readers can imagine the sequence and situation of the story easily. The way the writers organize the words is simple and easy to understand.

 

Characters :

Major Character

  1. Aladdin : He was an orphan who lived with her mother in poor condition, but he could survive with his strength and his struggle. He always wanted to know about something, careful boy, cheer and give affection to his mother. Aladdin grew into a tall handsome young man and married to the Sultan’s daughter Halima.

Minor Characters

  1. The Wizard : The wizard met Aladdin when Aladdin was looking for wild figs outside the town. This wizard asked Aladdin to pick up an oil lamp on the sewer. He was a cruel person. He left Aladdin on the sewer because Aladdin did not obey his command. Later, he disguised as a strange merchant in order to get the oil lamp back.
  2. Halima : She was married to Aladdin. A Sultan’s daughter who was very beautiful and charming. She had not known that Aladdin’s possessions came from the genie until they revealed at the end of the story.
  3. 6. Sultan : He owned the palace and the kingdom. He was a dependent person and unable to make certain decision. He relied to his Chamberlain to make every decision.
  1. The first genie: A great genie with clasped hands that appeared on a cloud, this genie hid into the ring.
  2. Aladdin’s mother: A strong woman who loved his son very much. Although she was poor, she kept struggling for better life. She wanted his son get the best for his life.
  3. The second genie: He was a prisoner in the lamp, waiting to be freed by someone rubbing it and he was the obedient servant of Aladdin. He respected Aladdin as his master and would do anything for him.
  1. Chamberlain : An evil man worked in the palace and wanted to marry Halima. He tried to baffle Aladdin’s wedding plan.

Characterization: The author placed Aladdin as the center figure in the story, he characterizes Aladdin as a person who has high expectation even though comes from the poor family, he created Aladdin as the “man” who can show the magic to the king trough their ability to call the genie, he also characterizes Aladdin as someone who loves so much their wife, it proves that the author wants to the happy ending story with the story of heroism of Aladdin.

Plot Summary:

(Introduction)

There lived a widow had an only son whose name was Aladdin. They were very poor. Aladdin did what he could to earn some pennies, by picking bananas in faraway places.

One Day Aladdin met a mysterious stranger. He just asked Aladdin go down a manhole and promise to give him reward, a silver penny. Inside the manhole, Aladdin saw a wonderful sight, there are trees dripping with glittering jewels. Surprised and suspicious, for why should the stranger, out of all such a treasure want only an old lamp. Aladdin wondered. Perhaps he was a wizard. Aladdin picked up the lamp. He retraced his steps up to the entrance. The Stranger began to shout and thrust out his arm to grab it. He slammed down the manhole cover and never noticed that as he did so, a ring slid off his finger. A terrified Aladdin was left in pitch darkness, wondering what the wizard would do next. Then he trod on the ring. Aimlessly putting it on his finger, he twisted it round and round. Suddenly the room was flooded with a rosy light and a great genie with clasped hands appeared on a cloud. The genie said that he was at Aladdin’s command. Aladdin wanted to go home and he was back in his own home in a flash. His mother asked about the silver coin. Aladdin only took the old oil lamp. Then, he told his mother the whole story. of how he had met the stranger and found old oil lamp. The widow began to rub the lamp. Suddenly out shot another genie, in a cloud of smoke. The genie was a prisoner in the lamp. He thanked to the widow and promised to be an obedient servant. From that day on, the widow and her son had everything they could wish for: food, clothes and a fine home, for the genie of the lamp granted them everything they asked him.

(Rising Action)

Aladdin grew into a tall handsome young man and his mother felt that he ought to find himself a wife, sooner or later. One day, as he left the market, Aladdin happened to see the Sultan’s daughter Halima in her sedan chair being carried through the streets. He only caught a fleeting glimpse of the princess, but it was enough for him to want to marry her. And indeed, the Sultan was easily persuaded by a casket full of big diamonds to admit the widow to the palace. He told the widow that her son must bring proof of his power and riches. This was mostly the Chamberlain’s idea, for he himself was eager to marry the beautiful black-eyed Sultan’s daughter. If Aladdin wants to marry Halima, he must send him forty slaves tomorrow. Every slave must bring a box of precious stones. And forty Arab warriors must escort the treasure. Aladdin’s mother went sadly home. Aladdin however, when he heard the news, was not at all dismayed. He picked up the lamp, rubbed it harder than ever and told the genie what he required. The genie built him a palace. The last obstacle had been overcome. The wedding took place with great celebrations and the Sultan was especially happy at finding such a rich and powerful.

(Climax)

Now, Aladdin had always kept his secret to himself. Only his mother knew it. Halima had been kept in the dark. And so, now, wanting to give Aladdin a surprise as well as make a good bargain, she fetched the old oil lamp she had seen Aladdin tuck away, and gave it to the merchant in exchange for a new one. The merchant quickly began to rub it. The genie was now at the service of the wizard who had got his magic lamp back. He whisked away all Aladdin’s possessions and magically sent the palace and the princess to an unknown land. Aladdin and the Sultan were at their wits’ end. Nobody knew what had happened.

(Falling Action)

Only Aladdin knew it had something to do with the magic lamp. He remembered the genie of the ring from the wizard’s finger. Slipping the ring on his finger, Aladdin twisted it round and round. He ordered the genie to take him to the place where the wizard has hidden his wife. In a flash, he found himself inside his own palace. He saw the wizard and the princess, now his servant. Aladdin ordered his wife to take a powder and put it into the wizard’s tea. The powder quickly took effect and the wizard fell into a deep sleep. Aladdin hunted for the lamp. He thought of peering underneath the pillow. At last, He found the lamp. Aladdin called the genie and ordered him to put this wicked wizard in chains and take him far away where he’ll never be found again. He reassured her wife that everything is all right as he told his wife the whole story of how he had met the wizard and found the magic lamp that had enabled him to marry her. Everything went back to normal and the happy pair hugged each other tenderly.

(Resolution)

The Sultan was almost ill with worry. His daughter had disappeared along with the palace, and then his son- in-law had vanished too. Suddenly, the palace rose into the air and sped over the Sultan’s kingdom. Aladdin and Halima rushed to embrace the Sultan. To this very day, in that distant country, you can still admire the traces of an ancient palace which folk call the palace that came from the skies.

 

References :

“Grimm Brothers.” Microsoft® Encarta® 2009 [DVD]. Redmond, WA: Microsoft Corporation, 2008.

http://fiction.eserver.org/short/aladdin.html/ (accessed 28 October 2009)

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